Author Archives: Jay

babygiraffe

New Baby Giraffe Born

Look What The Stork Dropped In!

Utah’s Hogle Zoo is pleased to introduce a 6-foot bundle of leggy joy: Our new baby giraffe, Willow!

GiraffeMeet Willow, our newest family member.

The young female hit the ground – literally – Wednesday, Jan. 13, 12:23pm. Giraffes face up to a 4-foot fall when they’re born! The little pile of limbs was immediately cleaned up by mama, 13 year-old Pogo, and was standing up nursing within the hour.

Willow, the keepers estimate, is six feet tall and weighs roughly 125 pounds.

Willow“We are very excited to have a baby giraffe; she is absolutely precious,” said Holly Peterson, giraffe keeper. “Her mom is doing such a great job with her – she’s protective and attentive. And Riley is also curious about the little one; he’ll stick his head over from the neighboring stall to sniff her.”

Father, 12 year old Riley, returned to Hogle Zoo after a brief stay at Oregon Zoo while construction of the new African Savanna was completed.

Giraffes have been an important part of Hogle Zoo since 1969, and the Zoo is proud of the 17 successful giraffe births over that time period.

“I believe we have the 2nd oldest giraffe, ‘auntie’ Daphne, and the youngest giraffe, Willow, in the country,” Peterson said. “AnWillowPogod our other females, the aunties, are doing great with Willow. They seek her out to sniff and lick her – it’s awesome.”

Mom and baby are doing great. They’ve been spending the last week bonding. They will not be able to greet the public, however, until the weather warms up a bit.

Mom, Pogo, and baby Willow

ZooSnooz

When you Snooz, do you dream of animals? If so, come dream at the zoo! This program allows you spend time at the zoo after hours, take a private zoo tour, led by one of our Eco-Explorers, enjoy a snack, meet our animal ambassadors, and so much more!

This interactive program is designed for any school, scout, youth organization, or family group. Campers sleep in a heated/air conditioned building. A minimum of 15 participants is required (smaller groups may register but a minimum fee will be charged). The fee covers admission, the program, staff, night security, evening snack and breakfast.

  • 6:00 PM — 9:00 AM
  • Ages 5 and up
  • $55 per person (minimum group of 15 required)
  • One adult required for every five youths.
  • Limited dates, call for availability
  • A four-week advance reservation is required.

Contact our Eco-Explorer Team Lead, at akoontz@hoglezoo.org or (801) 584-1788 to book your ZooSnooz.

 

Chinese Goral

We received our two male Chinese goral from the Lee Richardson zoo (Kansas) to join the four male markhor in the large rugged exhibits south of Asian Highlands. This is the first time this species has been exhibited at Utah’s Hogle Zoo.

AZA

Hogle Zoo Receives Quarter Century Honor

SALT LAKE CITY, UT (Jan. 6, 2016) – Utah’s Hogle Zoo is proud to announce recognition for maintaining continuous accreditation with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) for 25 years or more.

AZA, the primary accrediting body for top zoos and aquariums in the United States since 1974, recently announced recipients for the Association’s Quarter Century Award.

Utah’s Hogle Zoo was among the inaugural group of 119 awardees and sits in even more elite company – boasting continuous accreditation for 36 years, (receiving its first accreditation in 1979).

“We are honored to be recognized for more than a quarter century of professional accreditation,” said Craig Dinsmore, Hogle Zoo executive director. “This is a testament to both the dedication of our amazing employees for their efforts to maintain excellence, and to the continued support of our community to help us be the best zoo we can be. The award reflects our continued commitment to provide the very best care for our resident animals, and to nurturing respect for the natural world.”

This new award acknowledges facilities that have maintained AZA accreditation continuously for 25 years or more, highlighting their commitment to animal care, welfare, conservation, education and more.

“AZA is dedicated to ensuring that the highest standards in the zoological profession are met, and this means that the accreditation process is therefore quite rigorous,” said AZA President and CEO Jim Maddy. “The fact that these aquariums and zoos have maintained continuous AZA accreditation for 25 years or more is an extraordinary achievement that deserves to be celebrated.”

To be accredited, AZA-accredited facilities have completed a thorough review to ensure that they meet and will continue to meet rising standards, which include animal care, veterinary programs, conservation, education, and safety. AZA requires zoos and aquariums to successfully complete this rigorous accreditation process every five years in order to be members of the Association.

The accreditation process includes a detailed application and a meticulous on-site inspection by a team of trained zoo and aquarium professionals. The inspecting team observes all aspects of the institution’s operation, including animal care; keeper training; safety for visitors, staff and animals; educational programs; conservation efforts; veterinary programs; financial stability; risk management; visitor services; and other areas. Finally, top officials are interviewed at a formal hearing of AZA’s independent Accreditation Commission, after which accreditation is granted, tabled, or denied. Any institution that is denied may reapply one year after the Commission’s decision is made.

AZAConf

Hogle Zoo Hosts 2015 AZA Conference

SALT LAKE CITY ­ — Beginning tomorrow, Utah’s Hogle Zoo will play host to over 2,000 wildlife experts and conservation specialists during the 2015 annual conference of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), Sept. 18-21.

“When looking for a city to host the AZA annual conference, we knew Salt Lake City would be a great fit,” said Jim Maddy, AZA President and CEO. “The conference was last held in Salt Lake in 1971 and 287 people were in attendance. A lot has changed over the years, particularly at the renowned Utah’s Hogle Zoo and, this year, approximately 2,200 aquarium and zoo professionals are looking forward to experiencing the city’s beautiful surroundings, history, variety of offerings and close proximity to national parks.”

The conference will kick off Friday night at beautiful Library Square as AZA delegates eat, sip and mingle during the Ice Breaker – which, proudly, will be a zero-waste event for the first time in AZA history. “AZA organizations make significant contributions to conservation,” said Liz Larsen, conservation coordinator at Hogle Zoo. “Practicing zero-waste at this event is a great way for us to demonstrate our commitment to reducing our impact on our natural resources. Thank you to the city and our community partners for their help in making this possible.”

Two keynote speakers will address the delegates: Dr. M. Sanjayan (Sept. 19) a global conservation scientist, writer and Emmy-nominated news contributor, speaking on conservation improving human well-being. And OCEARCH Founding Chairman Chris Fischer (Sept. 20) an ocean explorer who’s led 22 global expeditions researching sharks.

Conservation will again be a highlighted topic at this year’s conference. AZA-accredited institutions are already investing $154 million in support of approximately 3,145 conservation initiatives in more than 130 countries.

In addition to conservation, there will be 80 program sessions covering numerous topics from the latest in exhibit design to innovations in education to advances in animal care. In addition, more than 140 companies that support the zoo and aquarium community will be featured in a lively exhibit hall.

“It is both an honor and an acknowledgement to be hosting this year’s AZA Annual Conference,” said Craig Dinsmore, Hogle Zoo executive director. “Zoo and Aquarium professionals from throughout the U.S. and abroad will be gathered here to share the latest advancement in conservation science, education and programs for stewardship of our planet and its amazing wildlife. We couldn’t be more proud!”

Fewer than 10% of the roughly 2,800 animal facilities in the country are accredited by the AZA. The stringent accreditation process means guests seeing an AZA logo on an animal institution, know they are supporting the ‘gold standard’ in animal care and welfare. Accredited facilities have been examined by a panel of experts and are recognized as having met AZA’s high standards and practices.

Tuah

Baby Orangutan

The Zoo announces the birth of a male baby orangutan.

Age: 5 months
Weight: 11 pounds
Length: 14 inches long
Hair: 2-3 inches long and ORANGE!

It’s been a busy few months in the Great Ape Building at Utah’s Hogle Zoo but we’re finally able to let the cat … errr…. the ape, out of the bag!

Meet Tuah – our five month-old Bornean orangutan who has had staff in the clouds!

“Tuah means ‘luck’ in Malay,” said ape keeper Abby Green. “And we just feel so incredibly lucky to have him.”

Tuah’s parents, Eve and Elijah, both passed away last year; Eve just a few weeks after Tuah’s birth. “It was a really sad time here,” said Green. “But he’s given all of us something to focus on – especially his big sister Acara.”

And focus, Acara has! “She’s really stepped up as being his caregiver and we’re 100% pleased with how well she’s doing.”

After Eve’s passing, animal Care staff worked closely with AZA (Assoc. of Zoos and Aquariums) and the Orangutan SSP (Species Survival Plan) to come up with the best plan of attack for raising the little ape – a species that requires constant attention from mom.

This meant 24-hour care from the keepers who worked round-the-clock shifts. “We’d try sleeping in the recliner but the floor ended up being more comfortable,” Green said. “We’d sleep on the hay – we had a hay pillow and everything. We itched terribly but got used to it!”

For four months, keepers ate, slept and brought changes of clothes to ensure Tuah was getting not only the best care, but working on his bond with big sis.

Keepers worked with Acara prior to Tuah’s birth on how to be gentle around baby brother. But after Eve’s passing, the training took on a new level of importance.

“We had to teach Acara [who will be 10 in May] how to be a mom,” Green said. “We taught her ‘gentle’ and ‘bottle’ and ‘leave it.'”

Keepers started with baby dolls, teaching Acara how to hold a baby right-side-up. “She also had to learn ‘bottle’ when we need her to bring him to the door for a feeding.”

Acara also had to adjust to moving around her exhibit with the hairy little guy clinging to her. “She’s done an amazing job,” Green said. “She’s eager to learn, she’s interested and she’s smart.”

With a little help from the keepers, Acara and Tuah were brought together, in just four months – an impressively short amount of time. “It took us nine months with Acara and Eve, so we’re really happy it’s gone so well.”

Tuah

It’s A Boy!

Age: 5 months
Weight: 11 pounds
Length: 14 inches long
Hair: 2-3 inches long and ORANGE!

It’s been a busy few months in the Great Ape Building at Utah’s Hogle Zoo but we’re finally able to let the cat out of the bag… errr…. the ape!

 

Meet Tuah – our five month-old Bornean orangutan who has had staff in the clouds!

“Tuah means ‘luck’ in Malay,” said ape keeper Abby Green. “And we just feel so incredibly lucky to have him.”

Tuah’s parents, Eve and Elijah, both passed away last year; Eve just a few weeks after Tuah’s birth. “It was a really sad time here,” said Green. “But he’s given all of us something to focus on – especially his big sister Acara.”

And focus, Acara has! “She’s really stepped up as being his caregiver and we’re 100% pleased with how well she’s doing.”

After Eve’s passing, animal Care staff worked closely with AZA (Assoc. of Zoos and Aquariums) and the Orangutan SSP (Species Survival Plan) to come up with the best plan of attack for raising the little ape – a species that requires constant attention from mom.

This meant 24-hour care from the keepers who worked round-the-clock shifts. “We’d try sleeping in the recliner but the floor ended up being more comfortable,” Green said. “We’d sleep on the hay – we had a hay pillow and everything. We itched terribly but got used to it!”

For four months, keepers ate, slept and brought changes of clothes to ensure Tuah was getting not only the best care, but working on his bond with big sis.

Keepers worked with Acara prior to Tuah’s birth on how to be gentle around baby brother. But after Eve’s passing, the training took on a new level of importance.

“We had to teach Acara [who will be 10 in May] how to be a mom,” Green said. “We taught her ‘gentle’ and ‘bottle’ and ‘leave it.'”

Keepers started with baby dolls, teaching Acara how to hold a baby right-side-up. “She also had to learn ‘bottle’ when we need her to bring him to the door for a feeding.”

Acara also had to adjust to moving around her exhibit with the hairy little guy clinging to her. “She’s done an amazing job,” Green said. “She’s eager to learn, she’s interested and she’s smart.”

With a little help from the keepers, Acara and Tuah were brought together, in just four months – an impressively short amount of time. “It took us nine months with Acara and Eve, so we’re really happy it’s gone so well.”

And now it’s YOUR turn to meet the little guy at his ‘Baby Shower!’

  •  WHO: 5 month old orangutan, Tuah – which means ‘luck’ in Malay.
  •  WHAT: Baby Shower – to celebrate the new arrival
  •  WHERE: Hogle Zoo, Great Ape Building
  •  WHEN: Saturday, April 11, 10a – 2p.
  •  WHY: Because look at that face! He deserves a party!

This is Tuah’s public debut – a chance for guests to see this little guy for the first time. There will be face painting, crafts for the kids, opportunities to contribute to orangutan conservation, plus ‘I Met Tuah’ buttons for the first 500 guests.

With orangutans endangered in the wild, Hogle Zoo is hoping to educate guests on the plight of these magnificent creatures, what the Zoo is doing to help and offer tips and ideas for how Zoo guests here in SLC can help orangutans in Asia.

MEDIA IS INVITED TO A PRESS PREVIEW, FRIDAY, APRIL 10, 9A- 3P TO GET EARLY FOOTAGE OF TUAH AND ACARA AND INTERVIEWS WITH KEEPERS AND ZOO GUESTS. PLEASE CALL ERICA HANSEN, 801-541-6112, TO ARRANGE.

** MEDIA SHOULD CHECK IN AT GUEST SERVICES AND ASK FOR ERICA – 801-541-6112**

 

SuperBowlPick

Super Bowl Pick

What Do You Do Without a Reigning Champ?

Bring in the King!

The King of Beasts, that is!

With the passing of Eli, our big male orangutan who picked the correct winner of the Super Bowl seven out of seven times, keepers felt the only replacement this year would be the King!

Join us for Vulcan’s Vote! Thursday, Jan. 29, 10:30a.

Our young male lions are fierce, intense and they’re ready to rumble!

Vulcan will enter his enclosure and be faced with paper mache helmets of the Seattle Seahawks and the New England Patriots. Whichever ‘helmet’ he touches first will be the winner of the big game!

After Vulcan votes, his brother Baron will join him to romp, pounce and play. This is a great chance to get footage of our lions active and playful, and a great local tie-in to other Super Bowl coverage.

Crews should park in the front lot and check in at Guest Services. Please arrive by 10:15a so photographers have plenty of time to set up – the big cats act fast!

CONTACT: Erica Hansen – 801-541-6112